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Tabashir at A bit of sophistry, based on our Time measurement system. The heartiest strife of vertue is not proofe. Puntarvolo was a vain-glorious knight, over-Englishing his travels cf. Monday was the pageant-poet who, if Amorphus is Monday, as there is reason for believing, is once more rebuked by Jonson.

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But his imagination was as free as the winds. As this startling idea gradually took shape. Everybody knew who Cosmo Versal was. His eccentricities had filled many readable columns in the newspapers. New York laughed a whole day and night at the warning red letters. The Owl. It Is of No Consequence! Build Arks: It Is Your Only Salvation!

There Is No Escape! Hundreds of Millions Will Be Drowned: For Particulars Address: Cosmo Versa]. This was due to his extraordinary intellectual ability and unquestionable scientific knowledge. Of late years a sort of supervisory control over scientific news of all kinds had been accorded to them.

Nowhere was the atmosphere of doubt and mystery. He's leased the milky way. Leaders of finance rushed to the exchanges trying by arguments and expostulations to arrest the downfall. In the afternoon. This was strengthened by published despatches which showed that he had forwarded his warnings to all the well-known scientific bodies of the world. He's caught the planets in arrears.

The speculative issue slid down like wheat into a Nobody could trace the exact origin of the movement. This produced a prodigious effect. Cosmo helped his cause by sending to every newspaper a carefully prepared statement of his observations and calculations. They saw that Cosmo's mathe-.! The servants who had been interviewed overnight. But the next morning there was a suspicious change in the popular mind.

And swamp He'll let the And the mountains tall. Cosmo issued another statement to the effect that he had perfected plans for an ark of safety. The morning papers had columns of description and comment.

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But the papers. It was added that the phenomenon was unprecedented. Joseph Smith. People were surprised to see the new posters in place of the old ones.

From London. No harm seemed to have come to the "ignor- The roars laughter and applause with which ant masses" yet. And there was a note of positive alarm in a doubled-leaded bulletin from the new observatory at Mount McKinley. Stocks went down five. The next day all was on the mend. The sensitive.

It was the general belief that a little critical examination would result in complete proof of the fallacy of all his work. The character of this document was such that it could not be ignored. I'm not going to insult scienee by encouraging the proceedings of a mountebank like Cosmo Versal.

Cosmo Versa! Mention has been made of the strange bulletin from the Mount McKinley observatory. That would be one thirty-thousandth of the weight of the globe. Here was the most unprejudiced corroboration of Cosmo Versal's assertion that the great nebula was already within the range of observation.

Versal has pointed out that very thing. I tell you the thing is absurd. Just look at these facts. Cosmo had on his side the whole force of that curious tendency of the human mind which habitually gravitates toward whatever is extraordinary. Professor Pludder. His formula were acdeduced. The thing is beginning to be visible now.

The thing's absurd! The earth weighs six and a half sextillions of tons. This thing has come like a thief in the night. How could they dispute such testimony. You've got four of the biggest telescopes in the world under your control. Abel Able. Two or three of the members began to be shaken in their convictions.

To cause that increase in the level of the oceans only about one-eighth part would have to bo added to their total mass. Now if the level of the ocean were raised only about 1. He had immediately received an expostulatory despatch from headquarters which henceforth shut his mouth but he had told the simple truth.

The average depth of the oceans is two and one-fifth miles. These bulletins "I'll do nothing so ridiculous! But a yet greater difficulty arose. It's not the jdea that a nebula may consist of watery vapor that's absurd. And how are you going to get around. This was felt to be a very unsatisfactory method of procedure. On this occasion his force of character sufficed to silence the doubters.

The next morning it appeared in all the newspapers as follows bowed Official statement from the Carnegie Institute. Multitudes fled to the seashore. For mere raw material Cosmo must have expended an enormous sum. Unfortunately for the popular effect of this pronouncement. In the midst of all. No thunder-storms broke the serenity of the long days.

The public is earnestly adviaed to pay no further attention to the matter. Fortunately levium was easily rolled into plates. Al over the world. He pushed his preparations with amazing speed. The Ark was being made of pure levium. Cosmo did not fail to call attention to this unparalleled repose of nature as a sure prognostic of the awful event in preparation. Cosmo still found time every day to write articles and to give out interviews.

In consequence of the popular excitement caused by the sensational utterances of a notorious pretender to scientific knowledge in New York. Between the work of preparation and that of proselytism it politics. The multitude saw at a glance that here was a work that would coat millions.

Let the secretary indite such a despatch. Beginning with five hundred men. The heat became tremendous. Earnest Inspection Invited for All. The nebulas are not composed of water. Hundreds were stricken down in the biasing streets. If there were any danger to the earth and such a thing is not to be seriously considered astronomers utterance of the Carnegie Institution indeed fell flat.

You want me to name one. They could no longer ignore it after they discovered that it was seriously interfering with the conduct of public business. Are you aware that you have interfered with the measures of this government for the defense of the country? You have stepped in front of the government. Every member of the Cabinet was above the average in avoirdupois.

Indulge in no personalities here. Nobody followed Cosmo's advice or example. I know what occurred at the recent meeting of that council. What was the unanimous opinion of the entire council about the correctness of my mathematical work? And what. As he entered he was the focus of a formidable battery of curious and not too friendly eyes.

C of my work. His voice was steady. Within seven months not a warship or any other existing vessel will remain afloat. The disdain deepened on his lips. That man. I may add. Many of them had come in haste from various summer resorts. He was not in the least overawed by the hostile glances of the statesmen. I have strained the point in offering to listen to you at all.

President—there are men in his own council who are not so blind. As soon as Cosmo Versa] had sunk into the embrace of a large easy chair. All seemed magnified by the thin white garments which they wore on account of the oppressive heat. I am trying to save the whole human race from a danger in comparison with which that of war is infinitesimal a danger which is rushing down upon us with appalling speed.

He was shown immediately into the President's reception-room. Every eye was fixed upon him. Cosmo Versal's pressing orders. After a moment's pause the President continued: Cosmo hurried to Washington on the given date. But he looked as if he carried more brains than all of them put together. But let me tell you this. At last the government officials found themselves forced to take cognizance of the affair.

On the contrary. In consequence. I need hardly say to you that we shall. There is another following i3 only the first sign. The vanguard of the fatal nebula is already upon us. One official word calculable. To heat will succeed cold. The sky lighted. But when he mentioned "arks. Professor Pludder's conduct helped to produce the change of moral atmosphere. It had a menacing. At the same time the windows were shaken by tremendous blasts of wind.

Issue a proclamation to the people. Look at the blazing the proof is before you! The annals of meteorology do not record another such summer as this. The signs of disBut. The whole 'upper atmosphere was choked with dense clouds. I beg you to notice that he admits it. We have said that -the air lightened after the passage of the first pall of darkness.

Samson's big chair. Two or three trees in the White House grounds were struck hy the bolts. In a few seconds several large panes of glass were broken. Great Heavens. These swift alternations of impenetrable gloom and unearthly light shook the hearts of the dumfounded statesmen even more than the roar and rush of the storm. His ominous suggestion of a great nebula rushing out of the heavens to overwhelm the earth had immensely impressed the imagination of his hearers.

It was an awful light. What they saw outside absorbed every faculty. I implore you. I warn you. An inky curtain seemed to have fallen from the sky. He shook his head. For three weeks the sun has been feeding its furnaces with invisible vapor but look out. A cry of horror broke from the onlookers when a man and a woman suddenly appeared trying to cross the White House grounds to reach a place of com paratiye safety.

The noise was so stunning that they could not have heard him. He had been so completely surprised by Cosmo's accusation. There was a creaking of heavily burdened chairs. Peter's at Rome was said to have been encased during three whole minutes with a blinding armor of electric fire.

If this storm had continued the predicted deluge would unquestionably have occurred at once. The celebrated Leaning Tower of Pisa. Basil was nearly destroyed. At the end of that time the sun reappeared. The raging water burst into the basement of the building. In Moscow the ancient and beautiful Church of St. Rivers had careered over their banks.

This movement rapidly spread all over the country. After all. The report that instantly followed made the White House dance upon its foundations. Such things only occurred in early and dark ages. The downfall of rain far exceeded everything that the meteorological bureaus had ever recorded. Cosmo Versal alone retained perfect self-command.

The vagaries of the lightning. Only the tempest of hail. And yet. In spite of his slight stature he looked their master. The vast dome of St. The rain did not last. But the disturbed elements sank into repose as suddenly as they had broken out.

Their hearts bounded with joy. With amusing inconsequence people sold stocks again. Not a single discharge of lightning occurred in its vicinity. Some nervous persons found comfort in the fact that when the skies cleared after the sudden downpour brilliant rainbows were seen.

It leveled submarine cables remained unaffected. They hugged the — submerged. Their eyes sought one another's faces in dumb amazement. There might be great floods. Raising his voice to the highest pitch. In London the Victoria Tower was partly dismantled by a bolt. The streaming rain. Then came another outburst of lightning.

The writer happens to have before him an entry in a diary. As I passed across the edge of the shadow of the trees the ground ahead being brilliantly illuminated by the light of the comet I suddenly noticed. People went about with fear written on their faces. In a few short months we shall be plunged into its awful.

No such cometary monster had ever before been seen. Cosmo Versal eame to be regarded as a kind of Antichrist who was seeking to mislead mankind. The fact that there was nothing really mysterious about it not. It was written in the city of Washington by no less a person than Prof. People shuddered when they looked at it.

The phantasm was pointed out. You have all noticed it. This comet happened to be of unusual size. But one night the wonder and dread awakened by the comet were magnified a hundredfold by an occurrence so unexpected and extraordinary that the spectators gasped in amazement. That is true.

It moved with amazing speed. The explanation is plain: All over the world. Those who were absolutely incredulous about Casmo's prediction.: Just at this juncture. It came up unexpectedly from the south. Why that blinding brightness which the comet has displayed.

It 13 composed of rare gases. The double shadoivs had a surprising effect. It arrived by accident. Let it tell its own story: It is passing away. In this case there cannot even be an encounter. The astronomers now took their turn. Jeremiah Moses. There were two distinct heads. Professor Pludder led the way with a pronunciamento declaring that "the absurd vaporings of the modern Nostradamus of New York" had now demonstrated their own emptiness.

In fact. I walked out into the park near my house with the intention of viewing the great eomet. There is nothing to be — feared. I myself did not foresee its coming. Professor Pludder's statement. The park on my Bide the west is bordered with a dense screen of tall trees. Even those who knew well that it was an inevitable optical result of the division of the bright comet were thrilled with instinctive dread when they saw that forked shadow.

The cause of the double shadow was evident at once but what can have produced this sudden disruption It must have occurred since last of the comet? Calculation showed that it was not more than 3. Its division is not an unprecedented. It was so bright that it cast shadows at night. Multitudes thus found their feara turned into a new direction. Throw away every other consideration.

The heavens are so obscured that only the This was a brightest stars can now be seen. But they were making a fearful mistake! With eyes blindfolded. The sentence ran as follows: Cosmo's warnings and entreaties bore practical fruit. He drew plans and sketches. If they had given it a little thought. He gave the required information.

Without warning. Bky was watched with anxious eyes striving to detect signs of a deepening of the menacing. They concluded to postpone their operations until the need of arks should become more evident. The most expert mathematicians of the world have been unable to detect any error in my calculations.

In my own ark I can take only a selected number. Then a feeling of angry resentment arose. Business was paraimpossible to concentrate affairs. But their progress was and as days passed. People turned again to their neglected affairs with the general remark that they "guessed the world would manage to wade through. He inspired every visitor at the same time with alarm and a resolution to go to work at once.

I teli you solemnly that not one in a million can now be saved. Every night the twin comets. As to those who had sent inquiries about places in Cosmo's ark. It is a singular circumstance that not one of these anxious inquirers seemed to have paid particular attention to a very significant sentence in his reply.

Men began to inquire about places in his ark. You have already lost too much precious time. People forgot the extraordinary storm of lightning and rain. Standing on its platform. I am bound to tell I reserve absolutely the right to determine who are truly representative of homo sapiens. He had not been interfered with after his memorable interview with the President of the United States.

They try to dispute the data. Frightened men and women stumbled around in the gloom of their chambers trying to dress them- "N In the midst of it all a collision occurred directly over Central Park between two air-expresses. In God's name. They struggledf or breath as if they had suddenly been plunged into a steam bath. It gave such an overwhelming sense of the universality of the disaster.

The air was hot. The use of small airplanes within the city limits had. We shall all be suffocated. It must be the third sign that he had foretold. The collision occurred at a height of a thousand feet. It had come! Those fateful words "the flood" and "Cosmo ran from lip to lip. When the long attended hour of sunrise approached. It could not be seen. There wa3 no lightening of the dense cloak of darkness.

Both of the air-ships had their air foils smashed and their decks crumpled up. At every window. Every solid object that the hands came in contact with in the darkness was wet. I can hardly breathe. It was this frightful silence of the streets. Cries and exclamations rang from room to room. It was two o'clock in the — morning. Thi3 supersaturation of the air a principal cause of the difficulty experienced in breathing led to a result which would quickly have been foreseen if people could have had the use of their eyes.

Some managed to get a faint glimpse of their watches by holding them close against lamps. House lights. Many fainted. For the first time in its history it failed to awake after its regular period of repose. It was so dark that. But they were too much injured to get upon their feet. The noise of the collision had been heard in Fifth Avenue. Only four or five. The stones and the window-pane3 are streaming with moisture.

The gasping and terror-stricken millions waited and longed for the hour of sunrise. The throwing open of windows brought no relief. The outer air was as stifling as that within. From the start everybody had noticed the excessive humidity of the dense air. As the hours passed. He would be a bold man.

As far as any outward indication of its existence was concerned the mighty capital had ceased to be. The arc lamps in the street flickered with an ineffective blue gleam which shed no illumination round about. These two. Sick persons. People who had expected at any moment to feel the water pitilessly rising about them looked out of their windows. There was a rush for the Elevated.

Once more were heard the ominous word. Women called up their friends. That was the pity of it! It was as if the world had been stricken blind. This awful strain could not have lasted. He is considering whom he will take. The wild scenes that had attended the first awakening were tame in comparison with meant. What It seemed to grow louder every moment.

Those who had before sought places with But only Cosmo called him up by telephone. Those who had begun to lay foundations for arks thought of resuming the work. Women wrung their hands and wept. The phenomenon had varied in different places. And then its voice was heard. It was the first time that morning had ever broken at midday. Presently the streams became large enough to create a noise of flowing water that attracted the attention of the anxious watchers at the open windows.

But before many hours passed there was real news. If they could have seen what they were about! But then they would not have been about it. Then everybody read with the utmost avidity what everybody knew already. As they retreated they believed that the water was rising at their heels. Belated aero -expresses arrived at the towers - from East and West.

The whole great city Seemed to utter a vast sigh of relief. Then cries of dismay arose. It would have needed no deluge to finish New York if that maddening pall of darkness had remained unbroken a few hours longer. But do not be deceived. At the same time the oppression was lifted from the respiratory apparatus.

Darkness is the microscope of the imagination. The great arteries of traffic became jammed. In Europe it had arrived thmns the morning hours. Some timorously descended their doorsteps. It is nothing in comparison with what is coming. And it is the last warning that will be given! You have obstinately shut your eyes to the truth. Of course. The terror had been universal. Telephones of all kinds were kept constantly busy.

The streets became filled. In a few minutes there was no running water left. In an incredibly brief time the newsboys were out with extras. If the water had been visible it would not have been —on The moisture — terrible. In some the darkness had not been complete. But at last one of them. Others made their way to the roofs.

Then their reason would not have been dethroned. Cosmo received him with a reluctance that he could not but notice. There were roomy quarters for the commander and hia officers. Ten million dollars. For a moment he did not speak. The great dark- — — ness. On each side four gangways gave access to the interior. The billionaire staggered back.

The comparatively few who particularly noticed this conduct of Cosmo's were deeply moved more than they had been by all the enigmatic events of the past months. The masses. Curious multitudes constantly mounted and descended the long approaches. The roof sloped down to the vertical sides. Did you ever hear the parable of the camel and the needle's eye?

The price of a ticket here is an irreproaohtitble record! Some sensitive souls were disturbed by detecting in his eyes a look that seemed to express deep pity and regret. Amos Blank. Of course the question of cost does not enter in the matternot with me.. Above these were two decks.

The three lower decks were devoted to the storage of food and of fuel for the electric generators. One man. If your flood is going to cause a general destruction of mankind of course you are bound to select the best. Then he said. They had all the convenience of the most luxurious staterooms of the transoceanic liners. Many joking remarks were exchanged by the visitors as they inpected these rooms.

Cosmo had a force of trained guards on hand. Occasionally he would draw apart. And there was a stir of renewed interest when the announcement came out one day that the ark was Then thousands hurried to Mineola to finished. The five remaining decks were for human beings. Overhead it was roofed with an oblong dome of Ievium.

But more nervous persons noticed. Inside they wandered about astonished at what they saw. Cosmo ran about among his guests. The extraordinary massiveness of the ark was Towering ominously on its platform. Rows of portholes. He placed sentinels at all entrances. One evening. Public curiosity was intensely excited by this singular proceeding.

It was a "Yearof Science. It was clear that his meditations were troublesome. For at least ten minutes he did not open his lips. Hand that no more visitors would be admitted. This seemed so absurd on its face that it went far to quiet apprehension by reawakening doubts of Cosmo's sanity—the more especially since he made no attempt to contradict the assertion that the scheme was hia.

His eyes glowed under the dark brows. They have rejected even the signs in the heavens. J alone. These are the functions of deity. I saw then what I had to do. No one was any longer encouraged to watch the operations. At last he e-aid. I have miserably failed. A great change had come about in Como's treatment of the public.

I told him plainly that he was not among the chosen. Amos Blank came to me. Speculation was rife for several days concerning the purpose of the mysterious ditch and its wires. He had now established himself in his apartments in the ark. I ought to have produced universal conviction. One enterprising reporter worked out an elaborate scheme.

But Cosmo and his employees gave evasive replies to all inquiries. When the wires were all placed and the ditch was finished. The other day. Then I began to reproach myself for not having been a more effective agent in warning my fellows of their peril. It is for me to say whether the genua homo shall be perpetuated. The flower of civilization. Cosmo and Joseph Smith sat facing one another at a square table lighted by a shaded lamp.

Nobody guessed what his real intention was. The voice of an archangel would not have convinced them. The success of all my work depends upon my not making a mistake now. After a slight pause Cosmo Versa] went on "If I felt any doubt that Providence has foreordained me to do this work.

The next move of Cosmo Versal was taken without any knowledge or suspicion on the part of the public. It is too great for human capacity and yet how can I cast it off? Smith had a pile of writing paper before him. I would. I will. I have settled the general principle. Both are necessary.

It rends my heart to think of it. Smith obeyed. I may add to or subtract from it later. I am is easy lines for me? I can't crowd out others as desirable as he for the sake of carrying all of his stripes. I shall begin with men of science. I do not conceal from you the fact that I should like to see him convicted — — — — But I must harden my heart.

But that will have to be subject to certain excepVery aged persons in general will not do they could not survive the long voyage. I am going to save Pludder. Two of them may be children a man. If I invite a man who possesses unquestionable qualifications. Presently he looked up with an air of decision. Nobody would listen to me. Dumfounded and muttering under his breath.

Joseph Smith fairly jumped with astonishment. Smith dropped his eyes. There was no science then. They are the true leaders. Pludder has a good brain. At last Cosmo Versal ceased his dictation. If I should leave them out. Children are indispensable but they must not be too young—infants in arms would not do at all.

According to probability. I attack the question by inquiring who represent the best elements of humanity? Let us first consider men. Put down his name at the head of the Cosmo Versal was again silent for a long timeFinally he appeared to throw off the incubus. You will remember. Some men are born rulers and leaders. The principles of eugenics demand a wide field of selec- — — "There you've hit actly what bothers me.

But so be it. But the aged people and the children there's the difficulty. I consider the way he made his money. I have set down the principal ones as they occurred to me. For half an hour complete silence reigned. He'll see that equity prevails. Then came the ten statesmen who were chosen with utter disregard to racial and national lines. Great—" the "Enough. In selecting his ten business magnates.

James Henry Blackwitt. President of the French repub- the "Will you take him? I do not as intimately as I know the men of am sure I have given them places Suppose you take this book and call them "Doctors—they get a rather liberal allowance. How could I have built the ark if I had been poor? Son of Heaven. Read it" Smith. Then he came to "Richard Edward. It breaks my heart to have to leave out so many whose worth I know.

Cosmo stated his rule: He is a true Confucian. The selection was continued until fifteen names had been obtained. President of the United States. Probable No. King of. At the end of that time he threw down the pencil and held out the paper to Mb companion. Sergius Narishkoff.

Emperor of China. I can't leave him out. Do you think I want to scatter broadcast the seeds of litigation in a regenerated world? There will be time to correct any oversight. He is not intellectually brilliant. That's curious. The 1. But I must run some chances. I like him. I'll save him if for no other reason than his veto of the Antarctic Continent grab bill.

Cosmo remarked that he had tried to be fair to all forms of genuine faith that had a large following. The world must always have rich men. Jules Bourgeois. But it's a pretty bad lot at the best. Finally the secretary said. But we have done enough for tonight. I will give you the form to-morrow. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country.

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Google Book Search helps readers discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web at http: A month before his birth his father died and left the fiunily in poverty. He went as a youth to Flanders and joined the English troops in the wars of William the Silent with Spain.

Here he slew in single combat one of the enemy and took spolia opima from him. He returned with- out a penny to London about 1 and married. In the same year he fought a duel with Gabriel Spenser, a fellow actor, and killed him. He was arrested, tried, con- victed, but escaped the gallows through the benefit of clergy.

While in prison he embraced the Catholic faith, but returned twelve years later to the Church of England. Jonson now turned to tragedy and wrote his great classical tragedy SejanuSf 1 For his sources of it he turned, un- like the writers for the popular stage, to the Latin authors themselves, quarried from them his facts, and affixed for reference footnotes to prove his " integrity in the story.

Chapman and Jonson were imprisoned, but Marston, perhaps the person really responsible, escaped. He be- came at once the first critic and, next to Shakespeare, the first dram- atist, of his day. In 1 61 6 Jonson collected his work and published a folio edition, which contained besides plays and masques a collection of Epigrams and The Forrest consisting of mis- cellaneous poems.

In 1 61 8 Jonson set out on hu memorable journey to Scotland. On his return to London he visited Oxford and formally received the degree of M. To the years and belong respectively the masques, Pleasure Reconciled and Newes from the New World. From to Jonson was busily engaged in writing masques.

Driven by want he returned to the popular stage. In 1 Jonson became chro- Bok ger to die City of London, was restored to fiivor at Court, and commissioned by Charles to write a masque. Lovers Triumph through CalUpolis, This quarrel with Jones harmed Jonson more than his enemy. In 1 63 1 the City withdrew his salary as City Chronologer and he was again driven to try for the stage.

His comedy. He continued, however, to write a few occasional verses in honor of the King and his Court, with the result that in he once more obtained the salary as City Chronologer. This he tells us in his Rod for Runaivayes: He was bom, it u probable, in or within a few years of His whole career was associated with London.

Here, in spite of inces- sant toil, he lived a life of struggle and privation. Henslowe tvrice had him released from arrest, from the Counter in February of and from the Chamberlain's Men in January of The registers of St. Giles, Cripplegate, record the christening of two daughters of Thomas Dekker, one in October of , another in October of ; they also record the burial of a daughter in November of , and the burial of a son at St Botolphs, Bishopsgate, in April of All these, it is possible, were children oi the dramatist, for St.

He began his career at a vrriter, we learn firom Henilowe, as early at least as January, From then on for forty years Dekker worked as dramatbt and hack writer, collaborating with other dramatists, revamping oid plays, and writing new ones. He died, it u supposed, about 1 Besides these, he wrote with Drayton, Wilson, and Chetde: With Drayton and Wilson he col- laborated in: With Dray- ton alone he wrote: He wrote with Ben Jonson in a domestic tragedy.

In he wrote with Day and Haughton: Within these eleven yean Dekker wrote alone the follow- ing plays and pamphlets: The yean from to were spent mainly in collaborat- ing with other dramatbts. In he wrote with Masdnger what may be conndered one of hu best efforts, The Virgin Martyr, To helongi A Rod for Runawayes, which describes the plague-fiight of Dekker was the author of various other writings.

A poem of his. Not all of them, to be sure, have permanently enriched our literature. The best of them, however, belong to the very first order of dramatic composition, and warrant Lamb's enthusiastic estimate: In The Guls Horn- book Dekker has given us an account of how the gallants conducted themselves at the play-house, and in doing so has made several allusions to what we know to have been actual incidents in which Ben Jonson and his one-time enemy John Marston figured.

Grosart, , vol. Horace Jonson was tossed in a blanket at the close of Satiromastix. Poetaster and SatiromastiXf both performed in 1 60 1 , represent the culmination of a quarrel, or series of quar- rels, between Jonson and other poets and playwrights, which found expression in a number of plays, and per- haps also in personal encounters.

We know that on at least one occasion Jonson and Marston came to blows, and the former's statement concerning this, made years afterwards 9 to Drummond of Hawthornden, contains the only direct mention by any of the princi- pals of the name of a man satirized by him in any play which treated of their quarrels.

In the Parnassus trilogy a number of autnors are referred to by name, but not as characters in the plays. They have bin at high wordes, and so high, that the ground could not serve them, but for want of Chopins have stalk' t upon Stages. Horace questionles made himselfe beleeve, that his Burgonian wit might desperately challenge all commers, and that none durst take up the foyles against him.

They do, however, give us the time during which the plays di- rectly concerned were performed, and the very interest- ing information that there were contemporary interpre- tations of the characters in Jonson's plays, the accuracy of which Jonson denied. The disclaim- ers of Jonson and Marston and their references to contemporary ndiofiterpretations are suspicious.

Richard Martin to whom he addressed the epistle prefixed to the folio edition of the play. In the quarto note and folio dialogue Jonson refers directly to his differences with his fellows. And yet, but some; and those so sparingly. As all the rest might have sate still, unquestioned, Had they but had the wit, or conscience, To think well of themselves.

But, impotent Uxey Thought each mans vice belonged to their whole tribe: That was dieir end. Onely amongst them, I am sorry for Some better natures, by the rest so drawne. To run in that vile Une. Jonson showed his annoyance at attempts to identify characters and allusions in several other passages, notably 3f ntroliuction xvii in the last act in Poetaster in which Asinius Lupus hands Caesar a paper found in Horace's study, and in- sists that the wolf preying on the carcass of an ass must be intended for himself Asinius Lupus and that the vulture, because it has a beak, legs, talons, wings and feathers, must be an eagle and therefore intended for Caesar.

An interesting fact in connection with this Prefiice is that Jonson again uses the term "petu- lant stiles" to characterize the writings of his enemies. We have from these statements of Jonson and Dekker the information that the Poetaster, Crispinus, is Marston and that Tucca in Poetaster and Satiromastix had as his original a certain Captain Hannam about whom we know nothing else.

This is all we know about the identity of characters in either of these two plays from any direct statements of their au- thors, either in the plays, or about them. He gives us information about characters in other comedies of Jonson and indicates that the plays are likewise to be examined for personal allu- sions. Tucca in Satiromastix says to Horace Jonson: Asper, Criticus, Quintus Horatius Flaccus.

Our next sources of direct information are contem- porary or nearly contemporary allusions to the stage- war by writers not involved in it as principals. While there are several such references ' they give us no information which we did not already have from the plays them- selves. The only really important statement is one made by Aubrey in his life of Sir Walter Raleigh.

John Pell: In his youthfiiU time, was one Charles Chester, that often kept company with his ac- quaintance; he was a bold impertenent fellowe, and they could never be quiet for him ; a perpetuall talker, and made a noyse like a drumme in a roome. So one time at a taveme Sir W. From him Ben Johnson takes his Carlo Buffbno i. Small 3 quotes as probably to be accepted, concerning the identity of Carlo Buffbne with Charles Chester, was noticed and discussed by Gifford in , and the reasons then presented for rejecting Aubrey's authority are just as good now.

Clark, , vol. XX 3 ntroliuctlon our author [Jonson] must have been in his cradle. The only per- sonal allusion which I can discover is to Marston,"' etc. Gifford-Cunningham, Jonson , ' Iv-lvi. Marlow, the poet on Bunhill, comeing from the Green-Curtain play-house. From Sir Edward Shirburn. Clark, n, A statement followed by Whalley and a number of other writers, who simply repeated what had been said, without any effort to as- certain the truth.

JntroOuction xxi practically ignored by critics until Dr. Small again called attention to it and quoted other references which tended to confirm its possible accuracy,' as does also independ- ently Mr. Mallory in his edition of Poet- aster follows Dr. Kempe and Burbage, two of the most popular actors of the time appear and, after an exhibition of mimicry, Kempe says to Burbage: Why heres our fellow Shakespeare puts them all downe, I and Ben Jonson too.

O that Ben Jonson is a pestilent fellow, he brought up Horace giving the Poets a pill, but our fellow Shakespeare hath given him a purge that made him beray his credit. Some think that it was Satiromastix which, al- though written by Dekker was performed at the Globe theatre by the Chamberlain's Company, that is, at Shake- speare's theatre by Shakespeare's Company.

Drake, JntroOuction xxUi The passage in which this statement is found is printed as follows by Laing: Both passages, as has recently been shown by Mr. Hart in Notes and Slueries, Series 9, vol. He thought the use of a maide nothing in comparison to the wantoness of a wyfe, and would never have ane other mistress. He said that two accidents strange befell him: For this identification of the last pair Dekker is responsible, for, in SatiromastiXf he speaks of Hedon and Anaides as being the same persons as Crispinus and Demetrius.

It has been shown, however see p. Tucca speaks of Demetrius Dekker as having been hired by the players, not by any individual or individ- uals, to abuse Horace Jonson. Jonson protested in several places against misinterpretation of his characters. Laing, Sh. See also p. In his youth given to Venerie, he thought," etc. There are two good reasons for such a change in punctuation: As a matter of fact the two things do not nec- essarily coincide, for we find Jonson in his earliest plays.

Marston was, at first, simply one of those whose " petulant stiles " provoked Jonson, but, on account of personal quarrels, Jonson later in Poetaster not only at- tacked Marston and also Dekker, but also made them representative of the whole class of " lean witted poetas- ters. Some of these are found in the writings of Gabriel Harvey, and Mr.

Jonson's censorious attitude toward the '' writings of his contemporaries and his personal quarrels with them are so mixed up in his plays, and in the minds of critics, that they have failed to separate them. Jon- son, however, has done so in several passages and has shown that his theories concerning style and also dra- matic structure were wholly apart from merely personal differences.

The same opinions are found expressed in Lovers Labour 'j Lost, Patient Grissel, the old Timon, and the second and third parts of the Parnassus trilogy. In Poetaster Jonson has combined personalities with literary criticism. His objection to " petulant stiles " is clearly set forth, while Dekker's reply, Satiromastix, concerns itself wholly with personalities and contains no genuine literary criticism.

A little while after the writing of Satiromastix wc find Marston and Jonson on friendly terms and Jonson and Dekker collaborating at they had done before. After this general consideration of what is for the most part to be regarded as direct evidence concerning the principals and their plays in the stage war, we come to our last source of information, the inferences to be drawn from statements in the plays themselves as to the identity of the persons represented.

Children of Paul's? Histriomastix M99 Marston Curtain? Chamberlain's At St. The Return from Parnassus ? As the "war" involved J both literary criticisms and personalities we have included Marston's Scourge of Villanie as concerned with the ridicule of affected language, and also the attack on Gabriel Harvey, in which Jonson evidently joined.

A statement of the works to be examined and the pro- bable order in which they were presented is given in Table I. We have already referred to the identification, by Mr. The quarrel between these two men and especially Harvey's censorious attitude to- wards others were likely objects of satire.

The reasons for these identifica- tions are cumulative and apparently conclusive. This censure of absurd words and forms of expression is found in all of Jonson's early comedies and, vdth growing impatience at the continued use of them, reaches its climax in connection with a personal quarrel ' H.

Monday was pageant poet of London from to , and although the pageants for to are missing, it is generally accepted as a fact that he wrote them. We have Jonson thus attacking the city poet Monday and the court poet Daniel, of both of whom he was evidently jealous, on account of their preferment, and both of whom he con- demned for inferior poetry.

The play was rewritten and changed considerably so that the folio gives English instead of Italian names to the characters, and omits or alters many passages. Jonson' s relations with Daniel continued through a long period and seem to have been at all times hostile. He referred to Daniel four times in talking with Drummond, 1 6 1 9, and always unfavorably.

Laing, p. Laing has this note. BlntroOoction xlix not necessarily mean that Marston intended Chrisoganus as an attack on Jonson. The character is commended for high ideals and unwillingness to cater to low taste. We do not know that Histriomastix was the cause of hostility between Jonson and Marston, whose names Weever joined in praise in the same epigram in 1 We have shown that Fastidious Brisk was Samuel Daniel.

He is the cen- surer who puts out of his humour each of the other characters. The final speech of Macilente is character- istic of Jonson. Of the other characters in the play we are able to identify Fungoso as almost certainly Thomas Lodge. The evidence for this identi- fication is cumulative.

The idenuty of Fungoso and Asotus causes us to put together the evidence concern- ing them derived from the two plays. Fungoso is a gentleman; studies, but abandons, law; is a spendthrift; ' See above, p. Asotus imitated Amor- phus as Fungoso imitated Puntarvolo. The fact that Lodge is represented as Fungoso a student of Law in 1 , and as Asotus a student of Physic in , is not "inconsistent" as Dr.

Small erroneously supposed. It may refer to the Burgundian fencer hanged at Tiburn in 1 Daniel's close connecdon with the court and his great popularity, both of which were causes of jealousy to Jonson, are clearly set forth by "W. Must I thus cast in Envies teeth defiance?

Or dedicate my poems to detraction? Or must I scome Castilioe's neere alliance? Nay, must I praise this Poet-pleasing faction; Lest in the Presse my overthrowe they threaten; And of the Binders laugh to see me beaten. The other passage is Epigram 11 of the Sixth Week, which immediately follows the one on Daniel.

The Sixt Weeke, Epig. Ad Jo. My Muse would muse. Such wlttes must be admired. Gullio' s sonnets and letters to ladies, his being "likened to Sir Philip Sidney. Selections from DaniePs fVorks by Mr. John Morris of Bath He dyed in October, Thomas Nashc was probably re- sponsible for this book. The identification of Gullio with Daniel fixes the identity of several other precisely similar characters in plays concerned with Jonson's quarrels.

Small, and Dr. Mallory who fol- lowed him,' missed one of the most important features of the war of the theatres by failure to recognize Daniel in any of the characters, and by the mistaken notion that Daniel was not at all this kind of man, in spite of such evidence. Mallory, Poetaster, p. Each boasts of his clothes and wears his mistress' garter as a favour.

Each praises the Arcadia. Gullio sends a note to his noble mistress to whom he had referred, but she on receiving it denies knowing him and resents his impudence. When Brisk makes boasts concerning noble friends similar to Gullio' s. Carlo Bufibne remarks, "There's ne'er a one of these but might lie a week on the rack ere they could bring forth his [Brisk' s] name.

Daniel is mentioned by name, or the titles of some of his works are quoted, or lines from his poems are quoted by or in connection with every one of these four characters, all of whom are court gulls. Hart, The Works of Ben yonsotiy 1, xlvi. As or bands, stockings, and handkerchiefs, mynehostes, where my trunkes lye, nere the courte hath inoaghe to make her sheets for her honseholde.

I am saluted everye mominge by the name of Good Morrow, Captaine, my sworde is at youre service. GuUio says that he often "sunge many sonnets under her windowc to a consorte of musicke. I myselfe playinge upon my ivorie lute moste enchantinglie " v, i.

Hedon con- stantly boasts of having kissed the hand of a countess. The evidence af- forded by these similarities is cumulative, and the attack on Daniel, with whom we know from other sources Jon- son was continually at odds,' is one of the most important features of his comedies. The men differed radically in their literary ideas, and their personal interests clashed, as they were rivals for court preferment, which Daniel had and Jonson wanted.

It cannot possibly refer to Jonson' s duel in which he killed Gabriel Spenser, though that has been suggested. Introimction xU and read them to ladies " ii, i. The duel, and the sonnets, evidently have reference to some actual person, and the similarity of the character to Brisk suggests Daniel. Fleay has said that in his opinion The Shoemakers Holiday and Old Fortu- natus also contain personal satire connected with Jonson's quarrels.

Of course we know Satiromastix, the reply to Poetaster, was by Dekker. No attack on Jonson is to be found in any other play by Dekker, and in Patient Grissel 1 , we find Dekker apparently joining with Jonson in the attack on Daniel, whom others praised in the highest terms. We learn from Hens lowers Diary that Dekker was collaborating with Jonson at the very time at which Patient Grissel vfzs being written.

Payment to Jonson and Dekker jointly, Aug. The plays were pagge of pHmothe and Robart the secondf Kinge of Scottes tragedie. Payments for Patient Grissel were made Oct. Greg, , Tol. I, pp. Let a scholler write. Tush saith he 1 like not these com- mon fellowes; let him write well, he hath stollen it out of some note booke; let him translate.

Tut, it is not of his owne; let him be named for preferment, he is insufficient because poore; no man shall rise in his world, except to feed his envy; no man can continue in his friendship, who hateth all men. Divine wits, for many things as sufficient as all antiquity I speake it not on slight surmise, but considerate judgment to you belongs the death that doth nourish this poison; to you the paine, that endure the reproofe.

Lilly the famous for facility in discourse; Spencer, but read in ancient Poetry; Daniel, choice in word, and invention; Draiton, diligent and fbrmall; Th Nash, true English Aretine. All you unnamed professours, or friends of Poetry but by me inwardly honoured knit your industries in pri- vate, to unite your fames in publike; let the strong stay up the weake, and the weake march under conduct of the strong; and all so imbattell your selves, that hate of virtue may not imbase you.

Doubt- less it will be as infamous a thing shortly, to present any book whatsoever learned to any Maecenas in Eng- land, as it is to be headsman in any free citie in Ger- manie. The date is perhaps early for any reference to Jonson, but it is interesting to see how similar the character of jealousy, as Lodge describes it, is to the character of Horace Jonson in Satiromastix, Daniel, for whom Lodge expresses ad- miration, here and elsewhere, was later, if not in 1 , Jonson' s rival and foe.

A comparison of the following passages from JVits Miser ie with Jonson's early comedies, and particularly with the descriptions, prefixed to Every Man Out of His Humour f will show a close connection between the ideas of Lodge and those of Jonson. He hath been a long Traveller and seen manie countries, but as it is said of the toad, that he sucketh up the cor- rupt humors of the garden where hee keepeth ; so this wretch from al those Provinces he hath visited, bringeth home nothing but the corruptions.

If he meets with a wealthy young heire worth the clawing. Oh rare, cries he, doe hee never so filthily, he puis feathers from his cloake, if hee walk in the street, kisseth his hand with a courtesie at every nod of the yonker, bringing him into a fooles Paradise by applaucting him.

If he be a martiall man or imployed in some courtly tilt or Tourney, marke my Lord quoth he with how good a grace hee sat his horse, how bravelie hee brake his launce: If hee bee a little bookish, let him write but the commendation of a flea, straight begs he the coppie, kissing, hugging, grinning and smiling, till hee make the yong Princocks as proud as a Pecocke.

This Damocles amongst the 3 ntro0uction xiv retinue carries alwaies the Tabacco pipe and his best living is carrying tidings from one gentlemans house to another. Forsooth a son of Mammon's that hath of long time been a travailer, his name is Lying, a Devill at your commandment: Tell him of bat- tels, it was hee that first puld off Francis the first his spur, when hee was taken up by the Emperor, and in the battell of Lepanto he onely gave Don John de Austria incouragement to charge afresh after the wind turned; at Bullaine he thrust three Switzers thorow the bellie at one time with one Partizan and was at the hanging of that fellow that could drinke up a whole barrell of beere without a breathing.

To the cobler he saith, set me two semicircles on my Suppeditaries; and hee answeres him, his shoes shall cost him twopence. The first play of Marston's which we are able to connect with the stage war is Histriomastix, This play, as we have it, is not in its original form, but is clearly a revision by Marston of an earlier play. Wallace, University [of Nebraska] Studies, vol.

The general character of Chrisoganus, the Scholar- Poet, with his high ideals, impatience at attempts to attract the multitude by unworthy plays, self-importance, censorious attitude, poverty, and work as a translator, satirist and writer of epigrams, is all suggestive of Jonson. The address of Chris- oganus to Posthaste and his players is a repetition of charges made by Jonson against Antonio Balladino in The Case is Altered, and the tone of all passages which xiviii 3 ntroimction do not belong to the Chrisoganus of the earlier form of the play is precisely that of Jonson.

Small suggests. We have in Chrisoganus Marston's first representation of Jonson. We do not know the date of Marston's birth, but a statement quoted by Dr. Grosart in the Introduction to Mar stones Poems, p. On Feb. He said that two accidents strange befell him ; one, that a man made his own wyfe to court him, whom he enjoyed two yeares ere he knew of it, and one day finding them by chance, was passingly delighted with it.

Whether this is so or not, it happens that in the adventure of Monsieur John fo de King with the wife of Brabant Senior in Jack Drum we have an incident in some respects similar to ' Conversations with Drummondy ed. The licentious French- man is certainly not Jonson in any other particular, even if he is in this.

Sec also H. Hart, Notes and Slueries, Series 9, vol. Jonson attacked Harvey's vocabulary several times. See above, p. The painted posts and praetorship of the father of Asotus are references to Thomas Lodge's father. Sir Thomas Lodge, a wealthy grocer who advanced money to the state.

He omitted his son Thomas from his will. Thomas Lodge, like Fungoso, studied Law but abandoned it for poetry, was sued by his tailor, was a sort of adventurer, making a trip to the Canaries with Clarke in 1 5 8 and to America with Cavendish in 1 He imitated and praised Daniel's poetry, as Fungoso imitated Fas- tidious Brisk.

Pseudodocheus and Gelasimus, in Timon, exchange rings and the youth receives a brass one for a gold one. There are two persons with whom they have, with show of reason, been identified. Hart, are briefly as follows. Puntarvolo was a vain-glorious knight, over-Englishing his travels cf.

Puntarvolo' s chief act in the play was to seal up Carlo Buffone's mouth, which corre- sponds exactly with what Raleigh is said by Aubrey to have done to Charles Chester. As it was dangerous to ' This identification proposed by Mr. The following additional reasons for his identifi- cation as Raleigh are given by Mr. Essex thereupon dressed himself and all his enormous following in the same colours, so as to appear to absorb Raleigh and his smaller suite.

Incroouction Iv sented composed of unshapen projects and compelled to defend himself against ' these detractors. Hart mentions Jonson's tribute to Raleigh's literary style in the Discoveries. Amorphus is not only a traveller but also an antiquary. Pell, when relating the incident concerning Charles Chester, for it is in the life of Raleigh that the story is told.

Imitation of an older and well-known adventurer and courtier by the young prodigal might have existed without indmacy or even personal acquaintance. The evidence which points to Monday as the original of Puntarvolo and Amorphus seems to be considerable, and taken together with the known fact that Jonson was a foe to Monday, gives us reason to believe that he was the man.

Puntarvolo has travelled, and speaks French and Italian. Amorphus likewise was a traveller who had been to Italy and France, and boasted of the distinguished people he had met. Monday went to Rome in impelled by " a desire to see strange countries and also affection to learn languages.

The English Romayne Life and , tells of his travels on the continent. He was messen- ger of Her Majesty's Chamber, about , and probably travelled as playwright and actor with Pem- broke's Company in 1 Monday wrote a book called The Defence of Contraries- Paradoxes against common opinion , etc.

Monday wrote poems which were set to music, and in 1 published A Banquet of Daintie Conceits: Crites is told to prepare the masque and Amorphus is rejected. Monday was the pageant-poet who, if Amorphus is Monday, as there is reason for believing, is once more rebuked by Jonson. V As Dekker used as many lines from Jonson' s plays as he could in SatiromastiXf we need not be surprised if some of them are dragged in forcibly.

The second opinion in regard to Anaides and Hedon regards Dekker' s appa- rent identification of them as an effort on his part to ahow that he as well as Marston had been satirized by Jonson, hence the writing of Satiromastix. Without the statement in Satiromastix no sufficient reason whatever has been found by any cridc for identifying as Dekker any character in Jonson' s Comedies, vrith the known excep- tion of Demetrius in Poetaster, We have shown what we believe to be convincing reason for thinking that Hedon was neither Marston nor Dekker, but Daniel, with whom we know Jonson to have been at odds.

If Dekker was wrong, and it certainly seems that he was, in regard to Hedon, he may also have been wrong in regard to Anaides. The resemblances between Anaides and Carlo Buffbne are so numerous that, if the latter was intended for Charles Chester, as Aubrey said, Anaides was prob- ably the same person. We have expressed our doubt as to the accuracy of Aubrey's statement. C Hart writes: Penni- 3lntrotmction Hx Several similarities between Anaides and Demetrius man finds Anaides to be a continuation of Carlo Buffone, which b obviously the case.

He is depicted as a ribald public jester at ordi- naries, and agrees in every respect with the old identification of Carlo with Chester. Jonson seems to have had a serious quarrel with Chester, if these representations be correct. See Jasper Mayne in Jonsonui Vtrhim,.

Two lines in this play iii, ii, , are quoted by Dekker in Satiromastix Pearson, p. Penniman [The fFar of the Theatres, p. It is no argument one way or other. Mallory, who for the most part follows and quotes Dr. Mallory, Yale Studies in English, 1 Mallory says p. Jonson complained of misinterpretation of his lines in the Poetaster v, i , and in the Dedication of Volpone, though perhaps not ingenuously.

Small are only such as might have been and doubtless were common to all of Jonson' s enemies. These points of siipilarity are all men- tioned by Lodge as characteristic of the jealous man in his description of jealousy in fFits Miserie, Such were the charging of Crites and Horace with plagiarism and the confession of inability to match them in know- ledge of foreign authors.

The similarities be- tween Hedon and Crispinus ' prove on consideration to be unimportant, especially when we have so much reason for supposing that Hedon was Daniel, and know that Crispinus was Marston. Both of these men were well- bom, could sing, and hated Jonson. All this was doubt- less true of a dozen other men of the time. In the absence of any other evidence to enable us to determine the identity of Anaides, it would seem more likely that he was Marston than that he was Dekker, if indeed he was either.

Jonson, so far as we know, had no quarrel with Dekker prior to the writ- ing of Poetaster f during which he heard of the hiring of Dekker to write a reply. Whatever the actual relation of the two scenes to each other, Jonson' s was almost cer- tainly the later. Anno Domini, 1 Believe me, master Anno Domini was of a good settled age when you limned him: Greg, pp. Small, The Stage garret, pp.

Let's see the other. Aetatis Suae Byrlady, he is somewhat younger. The allusion might have been the other way if the order in which the plays appeared was reversed. There are the following reasons for supposing that Marston's play was later than Jonson's. We simply do not know what the two pictures and dates mean.

JIntroimction ixv are not in any of Marston's other works. This may be so. There are numerous words and expressions in fVbat You Willi even in its revised form, which Jonson might well have selected as characteristic of Marston's diction. This is possible, but perhaps less likely than the other explanation, inasmuch as hostility to Jonson is shown in many passages.

We know that Marston's relations to Jonson changed between the pre- sentation of Poetaster in and the publication of the revised What You Willm , for in was pub- lished The Malcontent, dedicated to Jonson in flattering terms. Marston's Induction is in answer to the speeches of Asper, in which Jonson set forth his own merits and announced his independence of criticism.

There are, in the lines of each, statements and allusions applicable to either Marston or Jonson, so that critics have not agreed as to which is Marston and which Jonson. Small agrees with Mr. The notes to these plays in this vdume will show in what the attack and reply consisted.

That these plays refM-esented the culmination of a series we may infer from Jonson's ApaUgetical Dialogue already quoted. Dekker, hurriedly called to the aid of Marston and his faction, threw together a curious hodge-podge of William Rufiis, Sir Walter Terill and others, mixed with Crispinus, Demetrius, Horace and Tucca from Poetaster , called it Satk-omas- fix and presented it as the reply to Jonson.

So far as Jonson was concerned the ''war" ended. He aban- doned comedy for a time and announced the fact in the Apologetical Dialogue, Marston' s play. The editor of this volume has tried to set forth in this Introduction such information as we possess concerning the plays and characters in the stage war. Facts and con- jectures, based on what seems like evidence, have been presented, but, ever since the plays were acted, critics have differed in the interpretation of particular passages and the identity of characters.

What one critic has ac- cepted as conclusive proof of an identification has often been set aside by the next critic as erroneous or value- less. Lucian tells of a visit to the other world to consult Homer in regard to opinions of the scholiasts. The result was Homer's de- claration that he wrote every one of the lines which the textual critics had proved to their own satisfaction that he could not have written.

A similar conversation vdth Ben Jonson and Marston and Dekker would set at rest the disputes of critics concerning these plays — and it is probably the only thing that would. Tucker Brooke, in The Tudor Drama, pp. Years ago Dr. THE TEXT Thk text of this edition of Poetaster is that of a copy of the l6i6 folio, owned by the editor, collated with i the quarto i6o2, z the second folio , 3 the special large paper edition of the 16x6 folio, a copy of which is in the British Museum, 4 a copy of the 1 61 6 folio in the University of Pennsylvania Library, which contains several uncommon readings and is probably of the same issue as that with which Whalley worked.

See 28, 50, note. As the text of Jonson is almost always perfectly clear, I have re- garded it as a waste of time for both reader and editor to cumber the text with variant readings from the folios of and 17 16, the former of which professes to be a reprint in one volume of the two volumes of 1 , while the latter u merely an edition issued by a bookseller, and has no authority whatever.

Difierences in punctuation which do not affect the meaning have been omitted from the variants, which include differences of readings and important differences in punctuation. The editions of Whalley , Gif- ford x8i6 , and Nicholson , excellent as they are in some respects, are of no authority or value in regard to the text.

Mention must be made here of the reprint of the first folio under the super- vision of Professor Bang of the University of Louvain, and of the edition of Poetaster by Dr. Mallory in the Yale Studies in English. Mallory bases his text on the folio of 6 in the Yale Library, and another copy, differing slighdy, owned by Professor Phelps of Yale.

Mallory collated the text with the quarto, the 1 , , 6 folios, and with the editions of Whalley, Gifford, and Nicholson. The folios differ in some important respects from the quarto, but a complete collation of the former would require perhaps an examination of every copy of the 1 61 6 folio in existence.

For the collation of the large paper copy of the x6x6 folio, I am indebted to the courtesy of Mr. Simpson writes of the large paper edition: It was printed on large paper. The name of William Stansby appears alone on the imprint. Copies of this folio are tx- tremely rare. Only a few of the various readings take their place in the folios of Will Stansby.

William Stansby. Stansby, [and] Richd. Meighen [the bookseller]. Stansby, [and] M. Lownes [the bookseller]. The present text is from a copy with title-page 3. The University of Pennsylvania library copy has tide-page i. AdtedyUi theyeere idoi. The Author B.. L Mart. London, Printed hf William Stansbt, M. SIr, a thankefull man owes a courtesie euer: Your true louer, Ben.

To the. This dedicadon appears first in the i6i6 folio. Augustus Cjbsar. Thg Ptrs9nt. The quarto page is at fbllows t The Persons'That Act. I Angnttiu Canar. IS Criipinat. X4 Maydes. He, JEsop and TibuUus do not appear in either list of namea. Arising in the midst of the stage. Light, I salute thee ; but with wounded nerves: Wishing thy golden splendor, pitchy darknesse.

What's here f Th' Arraignment? Here will be subject for my snakes, and me. Till I doe bid, uncurle: Then, breake your knots. Shoot out your selves at length, as your forc't stings Would hide themselves within his malic't sides, 10 To whom I shall apply you.

Wonder not if I stare: These fifteene weekes. So long as since the plot was but an embrion 15 Have I, with burning lights mixt vigilant thoughts. After , ,. Envie Q, Livor, omitting stage directioa. F l6i6 and O1 print directions in margin.

To which at last I am arriv'd as Prologue. For I am riffe here with a covetous hope. To blast your pleasures, and destroy your sports, With wrestings, comments, applications, Spie-like suggestions, privie whisperings, And thousand such promooting sleights as these. The scene is, ha! Cracke ey-strings, and your balles Drop into earth ; let me be ever blind. I am prevented ; all my hopes are crost, Checkt, and abated ; fie, a freezing sweate Flowes forth at all my pores, my entrailes burne: What should I doe?

O my vext soule, jlow might I force this to the present state? Are there no players here? Eyther of these would helpe me ; they could wrest. Pervert, and poyson all they heare, or see. The folio i6i6 has Cyntkiat RtveUt as heading in- stead of Poetaster. You know what deare, and ample faculties I have indow'd you with: He lend you more. Here, take my snakes among you, come, and eate.

And while the squcezM juice flowes in your blacke jawes, 45 Helpe me to damne the authour. Spit it foorth Upon his lines, and shew your rustie teeth At everie word, or accent: O, these are gifts wherein your soules are blest. None an s were? Nay, then I doe despaire: This travaile is all lost with my dead hopes.

If in such bosomes, spight have left to dwell, 60 Envie is not on earth, nor scarse in hell. The Third Sounding. Scene I. Young master, master Ovid, doe you heare? Come, nay, nay, nay, nay, be briefe. Act I. Scene I, Q, Actus Piimut. Scena Prima. Ovid yunior, Luuus. F puta at beginiiing of each scene the names of all who take part in it.

Q, Ovid. Then, wken. The folio does not asugn the first speech in a scene, but it always belongs to the first charac- ter named in the list at the beginning of the Kene. The quarto always assigns the first speech. Hart a'man: Why so: By Jove, and three or foure of the gods more, I am right of mine olde masters humour for that; this villanous poetrie will undoe you, by the welkin.

What, hast thou buskins on, Luscus, that thou swear'st so tragically, and high? No, but I have bootes on, sir, and so ha's your father too by this time: O no; and there was the madde skel- dring captaine, with the velvet armes, readie to lay holde on him as hee comes downe: Pantilius Tucca? I, hee: Nay, and he be under their arrest, I may with safetie inough reade over my elegie, before he come.

Gods a mee! What ailest thou, Luscus? Lusc, God be with you, sir. Fie leave you to your poeticall fancies, and furies. Tie not be guiltie, I. Be not, good ignorance: I'm glad th'art gone: For thus alone, our eare shall better judge The hastie errours of our morning muse. Or that I studie not the tedious lawes ; And prostitute my voyce in everie cause? Thy scope is mortall ; mine et email fame: No losse shall come to Sophocles proude vaine.

Of Vakko's namej what eare shall not be told? Of] Asous Argo? Till Cupids fires be outy and his bowe brokeny 75 Thy verses neate Tibullus shall be spoken. Our Gallus shall be knowne from east to west: So shall Lycoris, whom he now loves best. The suffering plough-sharey or the flint may weare: But heavenly poesie no death can f eare.

Kneelehindes to trash: Scene II. Ovid senior. Your name shall live indeed, sir; you say true: Are these 5 the fruits of all my travaile and expenses? Ovid junior. No, sir. Ovid sen. Yes, sir. I heare of a tragcedie of yours comming foorth for the common players there, call'd Medea. By my houshold-gods, if I 15 come to the acting of it.

He adde one tragick part, more then is yet expected, to it: Q, Scena Secunda. I F addf Ovid Junior. Publius, I will set thee on the fun- erall pile, first. Ovidjun, Sir, I beseech you to have patience. Nay,this tis to have your eares damm'd up to good counsel!. Tucca, How now, good man slave?

Are these thy best 30 projects? Sirrah, goc get my horses ready. Indeed, Marcus Ovid, these players are an idle generation, and doe much harme in a state, corrupt yong gentrie very much, I know my Matter f of toorship, Q, my Knight of wonhippe. I have not beene a Tribune thus long, and 45 observ'd nothing: Th'art in the right, my venerable crop- shin, they will indeede: Your courtier cannot kisse his mistris slippers, in quiet, for 'hem: An honest decayed commander, cannot skelder, cheat, nor be seene in a bawdie house, but he shall be straight in one of their wormewood comoedies.

They are growne 60 licentious, the rogues; libertines, flat libertines. Mee thinkes, if nothing else, yet this alone, the very reading of the publike edicts should fright thee from commerce with them; and give thee distaste enough of their actions. But this betrayes what a student you are: They wrong mee, sir, and doc abuse you more, That blow your eares with these untrue reports.

I am not knowne unto the open stage, Nor doe I traffique in their theaters. You have, sir, a poeme? Cornelius Gallus borrowed it to reade. Cornelius Gallus? There's another gallant, too, hath drunke of the same poison: But these are gentle- 85 men of meanes, and revenew now. Thou art a yonger brother, and hast nothing, but thy bare exhibition: Name me a profest poet, 90 that his poetrie did ever afford him so much as a competencie.

I, your god of poets there whom all of you admire and reverence so much Homer, he whose worme-eaten statue must not bee spewd against, but with hallowed lips, and groveling 95 adoration, what was he? Q, Rerenewes; , revcnews. He saies well: Nay, I know this nettles you now, but answere me ; Is't not true?

But could this divinitie feed him, while he liv'd? Could his name feast him? Tuc, Or purchase him a senators revenue? Thou speakest sentences, old Bias. All this the law will doe, yong sir, if youle follow it. If he be mine, hee shall follow and observe, what I will apt him too, or, I professe here openly, and utterly to disclaime in him.

Sir, let me crave you will, forgoe these moodes ; I will be any thing, or studie any thing: Q omits. OvU sen. Propertius elegies? Why, he cannot speake, he cannot thinke out of poetrie, he is bewitcht with it. Come, doe not mis-prize him. I, mary, I would have him use some such wordes now: They have some touch, some taste of the law.

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And why not your Delia? Rows of portholes. To work out the idea. See also p. Nay, I know this nettles you now, but answere me ; Is't not true? It is as though I were a Chaucer, attempting to converse witli a man of the Seventeenth Century.

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Those who had only known the horse from pictures and sculptures were filled with astonishment by its living beauty. A tall, thin man, with bushy black hair, heavy eyebrows, a high, narrow forehead, and a wide, clean shaven mouth, wearing a solemn kind of smile, entered and grasped the little man by both. That man. The Atlantean, too, had now shaken off the gyves of unconsciousness.

Sex With Katia Nobili: Crites is told to prepare the masque and Amorphus is rejected. The gifted pen of Stanley G. But Cosmo and his employees gave evasive replies to all inquiries. Goe, goe, meddle with your bed-cham- ber onely, or rather with your bed in your chamber, onely ; or rather with your wife in your bed onely ; or on my faith. In other folios oomined, hat.


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